Master of Arts in Humanities

In association with Faulkner University’s Honors College, the university offers graduate-level students the opportunity to earn a Master of Arts in Humanities. Using the same core Christian principles and ethics in instruction and course structure utilized in all programs, the Master of Arts in Humanities prepares great leaders and thinkers.

Program Objectives

Through the Master of Arts in Humanities program at Faulkner, students will attain a general knowledge of core texts and ideas, and will possess the ability to demonstrate that high level of competency through written and oral communication skills. The program will require students to think critically, creatively and analytically to understand the relationship of Christian thought to the themes of the Great Books of the Great Tradition as presented through coursework and discussions.

Faulkner’s Master of Arts in Humanities program is designed as a preparatory program for students who are intent on pursuing doctoral studies in disciplines like history, humanities, literature, philosophy and religion.

Program Design

This graduate program uses the Great Books of the Western Tradition to create curriculum that is intellectually and spiritually engaging in the great tradition of the western world. The program takes teachings from many of these great books to elicit conversations and discussions with highly qualified tutors that benefit the learner. The program includes:

  • A foundation course focused on an exploration of the history and philosophy of humane learning.
  • Five core courses that take a more comprehensive approach to philosophy, religion and more.
  • Four independent tutorials with a special focus in your research interests, including humanities, literature, religion, history or philosophy.
  • A thesis course that manifests a broad understanding of program curriculum, thoughts and ideas.
  • Students meet at designated times for online discussions.

*The Master of Arts in Humanities program can typically be completed in six semesters.

Foundation Course (3 hours)
HU 5311: Introduction to Humane Letters and Learning
This course examines the history and philosophy of Humane learning using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Ecclesiastes, Hugh of St. Victor’s Didascalicon, Dante’s Paradiso, John of Salisbury’s Metalogicon, Bruni’s The Study of Literature, Guarino’s A Program of Teaching and Learning, Vico’s On Humanistic Education, and Barzun’s House of Intellect. Using threaded discussions, bi-weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.
Core Courses (15 hours)
HU 5326: Great Ideas, Authors and Writings: Understanding Humane Letters
This course examines the history and philosophy of Humane Letters using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Job, Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics, Sophocles’s Oedipus the King and Antigone, Aeschylus’s Prometheus Bound, Virgil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov and Wilbur’s Collected Poems. Using threaded discussions, bi-weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.
HY 5315: Great Ideas, Authors and Writings: Historical Investigations
This course examines select historical works from a philosophical and historical perspective using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Old Testament (Joshua–Esther), Herodotus’s Histories, Thucydides’s The History of the Peloponnesian War, Plutarch’s Lives, Tacitus’s Annals, Acts, Huizinga’s Waning of the Middle Ages, and Dawson’s Dynamics of World History. Using threaded discussions, bi-weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.
LIT 5324: Great Ideas, Authors and Writings: Literary Analysis
This course examines the history and philosophy of literary theory using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Psalms, Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Poetics, Cicero’s De Oratore, Quintilian’s Institutio Oratori, Horace’s Ars Poetica, Longinus’s On the Sublime, Augustine’s On Christian Teaching, Dante’s Literature in the Vernacular, Sidney’s An Apology for Poetry, and Blamires’s A History of Literary Criticism. Using threaded discussions, bi-weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.
PHL 5313: Great Ideas, Authors and Writings: Philosophical Inquiries
This course examines select philosophical works from a historical perspective using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Proverbs, Plato’s Apology, Xenophon’s Apology, Aurelius’s Meditations, Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy, Aquinas’s Summa, Heidegger’s What is Philosophy?, and Polanyi’s Personal Knowledge. Using threaded discussions, bi-weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.
REL 5322: Great Ideas, Authors and Writings: Exploring Religion
This course examines the history and philosophy of religious studies using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Genesis, Exodus, Plato’s Euthyphro, The Gospel of Matthew, Cicero’s On the Nature of the Gods, Augustine’s Confessions, Tertullian’s Apology, Anselm’s Cur Deus Homo?, Chesterton’s Orthodoxy, Dawson’s Enquires into Religion and Culture, and Lewis’s Mere Christianity. Using threaded discussions, bi-weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material.
Interdisciplinary Seminar (3 hours)
IDS 5301 Scholarly Inquiry and Writing in the Humanities
This course examines graduate-level scholarly inquiry and writing in the humanities using primary texts in whole and excerpts and using contemporary research tools. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Aristotle’s Poetics, Organon, and Rhetoric; Cicero’s On Invention and Rhetorica ad Herennium; Lucian’s How to Write History; Gadamer’s Truth and Method; Lewis’s “Meditation in a Toolshed” and “Bulverism”; Derrida’s Of Grammatology; and Barzun and Graff’s Modern Researcher. Contemporary research tools may include, but not necessarily be limited to Google Apps for Education, Google Books, and library databases. Using threaded discussions, conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects, the student will develop thinking, reading, research, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of the course material.
Independent Tutorials (12 hours)
5308, 5309, 5310, 5311 Independent Tutorials (HU/HY/LIT/PHL/REL)
This course is a focused study of an author, idea(s), problem, theme, specific topic, or historical era. The course will be designed between a student and tutor and will be approved by the Head of the Honors College. Readings, intellectual goals, and research will be determined based on the student’s interests and course of study. The course can be taken four times (12 credit hrs. total) with different content.
Thesis Course (3 hours)
5312 Thesis (HU/HY/LIT/PHL/REL)
The Master thesis is the pinnacle of this academic program in Humane learning. The thesis must demonstrate serious engagement with the Great Tradition, manifest a broad understanding of the curriculum, and also show some level of unique interaction of the authors, ideas, and readings studied in the program.

Total Hours: 36

Prospective students who wish to enroll in the Master of Arts in Humanities program must meet the following admission requirements:

  • Completed Application
  • A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university; you must provide transcripts from all previously attended institutions.
  • A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  • Acceptable test scores on graduate admissions exams, including the GRE (a combined verbal and quantitative score of 1000 or above) or MAT (400 or greater). Exam results cannot be more than five years old and must be forwarded directly to Faulkner from the testing service.
  • Three letters of recommendation with specific comments regarding the applicant’s academic work, professional experience and ability to successfully complete graduate study. The letters are often from the applicant’s faculty members or supervisory personnel.
  • A statement of goals and interest specifying the applicant’s interest in the program, as well as the applicant’s academic and professional background in preparation for graduate study (approximately 300 words).
  • Approval by the director of the Master of Arts in Humanities program.
  1. Submit a completed online application.
  2. Complete and print the Official Transcript Request  form and submit it to all previously attended schools with the appropriate fee.
  3. Send all additional items via mail to:

Faulkner University
Attn: Graduate Enrollment
5345 Atlanta Hwy
Montgomery, AL 36109


Offering Schedule

Fall

HU 5311 Introduction to Humane Letters and Learning Mondays Dr. Robert Woods
LIT 5324 Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings: Literary Analysis Tuesdays Dr. Chad Redwing/Dr. Ben Lockerd
REL 5322 Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings: Exploring Religion Thursdays Dr. David Stark
5308, 5309, 5310, 5311 Independent Tutorials (HU/HY/LIT/PHL/REL) Varies TBA
5312 Thesis (HU/HY/LIT/PHL/REL) Varies TBA

Spring

HU 5326 Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings: Understanding Humane Letters Mondays Dr. Robert Woods
HY 5315 Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings: Historical Investigations Thursdays Dr. Jason Jewell
IDS 5301 Scholarly Inquiry and Writing in the Humanities Fridays Dr. David Stark
PHL 5313 Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings: Philosophical Inquiries Tuesdays Dr. Mike Young
5308, 5309, 5310, 5311 Independent Tutorials (HU/HY/LIT/PHL/REL) Varies TBA
5312 Thesis (HU/HY/LIT/PHL/REL) Varies TBA

Summer

HU 5311 Intro to Human Letters Mondays Dr. Robert Woods
IDS 5301 Scholarly Inquiry/Writing Fridays Dr. David Stark
5308, 5309, 5310, 5311 Independent Tutorials (HU/HY/LIT/PHL/REL) Varies TBA
5312 Thesis (HU/HY/LIT/PHL/REL) Varies TBA

Note: All live seminar meetings occur 7:30–9:00 pm (CT) via Google hangout video call.