Bachelor of Arts in Humanities

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Faulkner University’s online Bachelor of Arts in Humanities will help you explore different interdisciplinary areas of study within the social sciences. At Faulkner University, we do this through online courses in philosophy, literature, the arts, foreign languages, and the cultural heritage of the West, while analyzing these fields through a faith-based lens.

Program Objectives

The primary goal of an online humanities degree is to have students gain exceptional critical thinking and writing skills, and broaden their understanding of the complex layers of society. The humanities equip you with the ability to analyze social interactions, the importance of diversity, and teach you how to communicate effectively.

Program Design

Our Bachelor of Arts in Humanities degree has several benefits:

  • All classes in the program are available entirely online
  • The degree consists of 40 courses—course length is eight weeks
  • Depending on course load, you can complete the degree in three to four years
  • Most courses are not sequential, offering flexibility in your schedule

Looking for an excellent foundation for your education? Along the way, you will learn critical skills that are essential for success in today’s job market. You will become a better reader, writer, speaker, and thinker—qualities in demand from nearly every professional employer. The online classroom lets you study at your own pace, which allows you to keep your current commitments while you enhance your career.

Utilizing Your Degree

What can you do with a degree from the Department of Humanities? Basically anything! Our graduates are in business, medicine, the law, and many other fields. If the hard sciences aren’t for you, you can take a creative approach with your education and work in areas such as theater, journalism, advertising, public administration, and teaching. With our faith-based lens curriculum, this degree can also serve as a launching pad for work in Christian ministry or biblical studies.

If you are interested in pursuing additional higher education, we have designed our bachelor’s degree to fit naturally into our humanities graduate program. This online master’s degree allows students to continue their studies with a more comprehensive approach. While other majors can limit students to just one area of expertise, a degree in humanities enables students to truly explore an interdisciplinary education.

Degree Plan

 

Christian Literacy (18 hours)

BI 1310 The Gospels
This course, using The Gospels, and questions of interpretation, evaluation, and application, will assist the students in greater understanding of this portion of the Bible. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
BI 1322 Acts of the Apostles
This course, using The Book of Acts, and questions of interpretation, evaluation, and application, will assist the students in greater understanding of this portion of the Bible. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
BI 2313 Books of Moses
This course, using The Books of Moses, and questions of interpretation, evaluation, and application, will assist the students in greater understanding of this portion of the Bible. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
BI 2324 Biblical Wisdom Literature
This course, using Biblical Wisdom Literature (Old Testament), and questions of interpretation, evaluation, and application, will assist the students in greater understanding of this portion of the Bible. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
BI 3310 Courtship and Marriage
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in courtship and marriage. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from The Bible, Aquinas, Erasmus, Bacon, Austen, Homer, Plato, Lewis, Tolstoy, Aristotle, and Kass. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
BI 3329 Romans
This course, using Romans, and questions of interpretation, evaluation, and application, will assist the students in greater understanding of this portion of the Bible. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.

Cultural Heritage Literacy (9 hours)

HU 2315 Western Tradition I
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in the Western intellectual and cultural tradition. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from The Bible, Plato, Aristotle, Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aurelius, Augustine, Boethius, Aquinas, and Dante. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
HU 2325 Western Tradition II
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in the Western intellectual and cultural tradition. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Erasmus, Machiavelli, Pascal, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Rousseau, and Swift. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
HY 2320 American Tradition
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in the history and philosophy of the American intellectual tradition. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Madison, Hamilton, Washington, Lincoln, Jefferson, Emerson, Thoreau and A Documentary History of the United States. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.

Mathematical and Scientific Literacy (6 hours)

MH 1312 Mathematics
This course will examine through careful reading and extensive discussion key issues in mathematical studies. Some issues explored will include number, figure, extension, relation, magnitude, multitude, continuous and discrete quantities, definitions, postulates, axioms, hypotheses, theorems, proofs, proportions, equations, measurement, limits, infinity, and certainty and exactitude of mathematical knowledge. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Apollonius, Euclid, Archimedes, Nicomachus, Newton, Euler, Frege, Hogben, Hardy, and Lieber. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
PHY 2317 Physics
This course will examine through careful reading and extensive discussion key issues and concepts in physics. Some issues explored will include motion, velocity, acceleration, mass, energy, force, light, time, and space. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Aristotle, Galileo, Newton, Faraday, Maxwell, Einstein, Feynman, Heisenberg, Lightman, and Hawking. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.

Information and Communication Literacy (9 hours)

EH 1311 Rhetoric I
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in the history and philosophy of rhetoric. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from pre-Socratic authors, Plato, Aristotle, Plutarch, Tacitus, Cicero, and Isocrates. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
EH 1322 Rhetoric II
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in the history and philosophy of rhetoric. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Blair, Campbell, Richards, Vickers, and Weaver. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
HU 1309 Technology and Society
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in the history and philosophy of technology. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from The Bible, Bradbury, Postman, Aeschylus, Bacon, Petroski, Lewis, and Berry. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.

Personal and Social Literacy (6 hours)

PE 1311 Health & the Human Being
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in the history and philosophy of the human body. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Aristotle, Cicero, Bacon, Tolstoy, Waddington, Schall, and Kass. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
HU 2330 How Markets Work
This course is an investigation of how markets work in providing for production, allocation of resources and products, and incomes. It explains that an effective system of markets is dependent on foundational and philosophical requisites from law, government, and the culture. Part of the Intercollegiate Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (IPPE) program.

Upper Level Area Requirements (33 hours)

EH 3314 Grammar for Liberal Arts (Prerequisites: EH 1311, 1322)
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in the history and philosophy of grammar. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Plato, Aristotle, Quintilian, Augustine, Milton, Orwell, Adler, and Jespersen. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
EH 3325 Rhetoric for Liberal Arts (Prerequisites: EH 1311, 1322)
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in the history and philosophy of rhetoric. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Demetrius, Longinus, Quintilian, Alcuin, Emerson, and Orwell. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
GB 3311 Introduction to Great Books I
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to a wider range of ideas and issues using various authors and disciplines. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Freud, Thucydides, James, Chekhov, Smith, and O’Connor. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
GB 3322 Introduction to Great Books II
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to a wider range of ideas and issues using various authors and disciplines. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Aristotle, Hobbs, Faulkner, Locke, Tocqueville, and Tolstoy. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
GB 4313 Introduction to Great Books III
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to a wider range of ideas and issues using various authors and disciplines. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Dewey, Plato, Mill, Kant, Kafka, and Woolf. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
HU 3310 Philosophy and the Good Life
This course is an investigation of our understanding of a good life and the ordering of goods it requires. Part of the Intercollegiate Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (IPPE) program.
HU 3320 Philosophy and the Utopian Temptation
This course is an introduction to the distinctive character of modern ideological politics, and the way that political philosophers have critiqued ideology and utopian thinking. Part of the Intercollegiate Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (IPPE) program.
HU 3330 Pursuit of Happiness: Culture, Government, and Market
This course is an investigation of how market and government institutions operate together in a cultural milieu that itself is the product of social interactions and these same institutions. Part of the Intercollegiate Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (IPPE) program.
HU 4324 Logic for Liberal Arts (Prerequisites: GB 3311, 3322, 4313)
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in logic. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Plato, Aristotle, John of Salisbury, Kant, and Maritain. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
HU 4326 Moral Philosophy for Liberal Arts (Prerequisites: GB 3311, 3322, 4313)
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in the history and philosophy of virtue and vice. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Cicero, Plutarch, Augustine, Aquinas, and Lewis. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
HU 4331 Beauty and the Liberal Arts
This course is an investigation of key ideas and issues in the history and philosophy of art and aesthetics through the use of Great Books readings. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Plato, Aristotle, Tolstoy, Hume, Kant, Dickie, and Collingwood.

 

Upper Level General Requirements (24 hours)

HU 4328 Readings in Christian Humanism
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key ideas and issues in the history and philosophy of Christian Humanism. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from Tertullian, Jerome, Augustine, Ambrose, Aquinas, Dante, Petrarch, Milton, and Lewis. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
HY 4310 Ancient Historians
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key writings of ancient historians. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from The Bible, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plutarch, and Tacitus. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
LIT 4312 Epic Literature
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to key works of epic literature. Readings may include, but are not limited to Epic of Gilgamesh, Beowulf, Paradise Lost, and Canterbury Tales. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.
PS 3320 Roots of American Constitution
This course is designed to increase students’ understanding of the key philosophical issues and historical debates that gave rise to the United States of America.  The goals of the course are:  to improve students’ ability identify the fundamental ideas, institutions, and traditions on which the American constitutional system is based; to recognize what makes a constitution “work” for a given people; to show what makes up our “unwritten Constitution” as a nation and people.
PS 4320 American Constitutionalism And Its Critics
This course examines fundamental internal challenges to the American constitutional order, from the question of slavery and arguments over the locus of sovereignty in the American polity, to the progressive revolt against the Founders’ Constitution, to contemporary notions of living constitutionalism.
REL 4311 Readings in Religious Classics
This course will use Great Books selections to expose the student to religious classics of the Western tradition. Readings may include, but are not limited to works from The Bible, early church fathers, Augustine, à Kempis, Ignatius, John of the Cross, Erasmus, Bonhoeffer, and Lewis. Using threaded discussions, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and communication skills.

Foreign Language Electives (6 hours)

French I

French II

German I

German II

Latin I

Latin II

Spanish I

Spanish II

Electives (15 hours)

 

Total Hours: 120

Admission Requirements

Prospective students enrolling in the Bachelor of Arts in Humanities program must meet the following admission requirements:

  • Must be a high school graduate with a regular or advanced diploma or have a GED certificate
  • If out of high school for less than five years, ACT (minimum 18 composite) or SAT (minimum 970) scores are required. ACT or SAT scores are not required for anyone having graduated high school more than five years ago.
  • ACT or SAT scores are not required for transfer applicants with a minimum of 24 transferable hours from a regionally accredited college or university.

To Apply

Tuition and Fees

2018-2019 Financial Information

TUITION
Adult – Montgomery Campus $315 per semester hour
Adult/AA – Birmingham Extension Center $305 per semester hour
Adult/AA – Huntsville Extension Center $300 per semester hour
Adult/AA – Mobile Extension Center $315 per semester hour
Military Qualified Students (60 hours or less) $250 per semester hour
FEES
Eagle I Initiative Fee $100 per semester ($50 if 11 hours or less)
Registration Fee $120 per semester ($60 if 11 hours or less)
Online Course Fee $55 per semester hour
Emergency Response Fee $10 per semester, if at least one course is on campus
Applicable Course Fees see full tuition and fee schedule

If enrolling as a traditional student, please see the full tuition and fee schedule for applicable rates.

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