Faulkner Law joins Alabama Supreme Court to host Constitution Day event

Faulkner Law BuildingFaulkner University’s Jones School of Law, The Blackstone and Burke Center for Law and Liberty and Alabama Supreme Court will host a free Constitution Day reception on September 17 inside the Alabama Supreme Court.

Faulkner Law associate dean and executive director of the Blackstone and Burke Center, Allen Mendenhall will be moderating a panel discussion between four distinguished jurists including Justice Will Sellers, Alabama Supreme Court; Judge Wallace Capel Jr., Chief Magistrate, United States District Court, Middle District of Alabama; Judge Bess M. Parrish Creswell, United States Bankruptcy Judge, United States Bankruptcy Court, Middle District of Alabama; and Judge J.R. Gaines, Fifteenth Judicial Circuit Court of Alabama

The event celebrates the signing of one of the nation’s most important documents. Our Founding Fathers formally signed the United States Constitution on September 17, 1787. Each year, the nation commemorates its signing.

 

WHERE: Rotunda of the Alabama Supreme Court. 300 Dexter Avenue, Montgomery, Ala. 36104.

WHEN: 5:15 p.m. on Monday, September 17

 

More on the Blackstone and Burke Center for Law and Liberty:

The Blackstone & Burke Center for Law & Liberty examines and promotes ordered liberty in the common-law tradition, including religious freedom, freedom of association, freedom of speech, and economic freedom. Because these freedoms have flourished under the common law and are secured by proper constitutional restraints, the Blackstone & Burke Center explores essential elements of common-law practice and jurisprudence within the framework of American constitutionalism, federalism, and private law.

The Blackstone & Burke Center is dedicated to the propositions that law is not merely sovereign command but rather that the first duty of legislative, executive, and judicial officials is to declare what the law already is. Therefore, the Blackstone & Burke Center generates research on natural rights, natural law, custom, conscience, and freedom of expression, in addition to the institutions, norms, and processes of private ordering that characterize the common-law tradition.

 

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