Faulkner University

Course descriptions for Ph.D. in Biblical Studies

BI 7301 Biblical Scholarship and Christian Ministry

This course is an advanced study of the inter-relationship of academic research and Christian ministry. This course is also intended to be an orientation to the doctoral program and to advanced research methods in biblical studies.

BI 7310 Advanced Studies in Biblical Hermeneutics

This course analyzes the principles of interpretation as they relate to ascertaining the meaning of the biblical text and its application to the contemporary world. Attention will be given to the evaluation of hermeneutical methods employed by both ancient and modern scholars (rabbinical, classical, modern, and post-modern). Additionally, consideration will be given to how genre recognition (e.g., law, narrative, parable, epistle, apocalyptic, etc.) affects the hermeneutical process.

BI 7312 Advanced Studies in Biblical Backgrounds

This course is a study of the history, cultures, languages, literatures, and religions of the ancient Near East from 3000 B.C. to Early Christianity (2nd century A.D.). This study provides background information for understanding ancient Israel, emergent Judaism, and their sacred literature, as well as the politics, society, culture, philosophies and religions of the Greco-Roman world of the time of Christ.

BI 7314 Advanced Studies in Biblical Textual Criticism

This course involves an advanced research in the text of the Hebrew Old Testament and the Greek New Testament. Special attention is given to learning about ancient manuscripts, ancient versions of the Bible, the history of textual criticism, use of the textual apparatus of BHS/BHQ and NA27,28, and the basic criteria for evaluating variant readings.

BI 7316 Advanced Studies in Biblical Theology

This course is a systematic study of major biblical themes with an attempt to relate them to current issues and to people living in the contemporary world. Attention will be given to background questions like concepts of biblical authority and hermeneutical theory. Methodological approaches will be historical, comparative, and constructive.

BI 7318 Advanced Studies in Religious History

This course involves the historical investigation of a particular individual, movement, issue, or theme with the specific focus being the biblical interpretation involved in the subject under study. Attention is given to the development, context, culture, consequence and influence of the particular subject.

BI 8311 Advanced Studies in Restoration Theology

This course explores a particular movement, person, issue, or theme in the biblical interpretation and/or theology of the Restoration movement (broadly conceived). Special attention will be given to the historical development, cultural context, and consequences of the subject under study. Investigation will include primary and secondary sources chosen to deepen the students’ understanding of ways those in the Restoration movement have understood and applied scripture.

BI 8313 Advanced Studies in Biblical Languages

This course will analyze the linguistic diversity (Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and Latin) of the ancient world as it relates to the biblical text and will incorporate a systematic process of memorizing Hebrew and Greek words. Students will also study the etymology of significant words and ideas, review grammatical concepts, and give an exegesis of selected biblical texts. Special attention will be given to the Hellenistic expansion in the ancient world precipitated by Alexander the Great and the emergence of koine Greek.

OT 8320 Seminar in the Wisdom Literature

This course incorporates advanced research in Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Canticles with a specific examination in the primary text of one of these books. Special attention is given to revelation, inspiration, canonicity, manuscripts and versions, authorship, date, ancient Near Eastern background, interpretative and critical issues, and relevance for the twenty-first century biblical scholar and Christian.

OT 8322 Seminar in the Historical Literature

This course incorporates advanced research in Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings, 1 and 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther with a specific examination in the primary text of one or more of these books. Special attention is given to revelation, inspiration, canonicity, manuscripts and versions, authorship, date, ancient Near Eastern background, critical issues, and relevance for the twenty-first century biblical scholar and Christian. Additionally, specific attention is given to narrative exegesis.

OT 8324 Seminar in the Major Prophets

This course incorporates advanced research in Isaiah, Jeremiah-Lamentations, Ezekiel, and Daniel with a specific examination in the primary text of one or more of these books. Special attention is given to the nature of prophecy, revelation, inspiration, canonicity, manuscripts and versions, authorship, date, ancient Near Eastern background, critical issues, and relevance for the twenty-first century biblical scholar and Christian. Additionally, specific attention is given to narrative and poetic exegesis.

OT 8326 Seminar in the Torah

This course incorporates advanced research in Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy with a specific examination in the primary text of one or more of these books. Special attention is given to revelation, inspiration, canonicity, manuscripts and versions, authorship, date, ancient Near Eastern background, critical issues, and relevance for the twenty-first century biblical scholar and Christian. Additionally, specific attention is given to narrative and poetic exegesis.

OT 8328 Seminar in the Psalms

This course incorporates advanced research in the book of Psalms, also known as the Psalter, with a specific examination in the primary text of selected psalms. Special attention will be given to revelation, inspiration, canonicity, manuscripts and versions, authorship, date, ancient Near Eastern background, critical issues, and relevance for the twenty-first century biblical scholar and Christian. Additionally, specific attention is given to poetic exegesis and the piety of the Psalter in which that piety is compared to the piety of Christian prayer and song.

OT 8330 Seminar in the Minor Prophets

This course incorporates advanced research in Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi with a specific examination in the primary text of one or more of these books. Special attention is given to the nature of prophecy, revelation, inspiration, canonicity, manuscripts and versions, authorship, date, ancient Near Eastern background, critical issues, and relevance for the twenty-first century biblical scholar and Christian. Additionally, specific attention is given to narrative and poetic exegesis.

NT 8321 Seminar in the Epistle to the Hebrews

This course will involve a close critical reading of selected portions of the Epistle to the Hebrews in Greek. Besides an exposure to the critical, historical, and doctrinal issues that modern scholars have raised about this book and its interpretation (e.g., authorship, destination, the relationship between the Old and New Covenants, the possibility of apostasy, etc.), students will gain a better understanding of the book’s message and an appreciation for the practical application of its teachings to the church and to individuals living today.

NT 8323 Seminar in the Pauline Letters

This course incorporates advanced research in Romans, 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, and Philemon with a specific examination in the primary text of one or more of these books. Special attention is given to revelation, inspiration, canonicity, manuscripts and versions, authorship, date, the Greco-Roman and Jewish backgrounds of Paul’s writings, critical issues, theological issues, and relevance for the twenty-first century biblical scholar and Christian.

NT 8325 Seminar in the Book of Acts

Besides reading selected portions of the Book of Acts in Greek, students will explore questions of authorship, the date of composition, and the purpose for which this book was written. Attention will be given to the narrative with an emphasis on its historical reliability and on ways the events recorded relate to the Epistles of Paul. Practical implications for the modern church will also be considered and discussed.

NT 8327 Seminar in the Gospels

This course incorporates advanced research in Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John with a specific examination in the primary text of one of these books. Special attention is given to revelation, inspiration, canonicity, manuscripts and versions, authorship, date, source theories, the Greco-Roman and Jewish background of the gospels, critical issues, theological issues, and relevance for the twenty-first century biblical scholar and Christian.

NT 8329 Seminar in the General Epistles and the Johannine Literature

This course involves an advanced reading of selected Greek texts in the books of James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, and Revelation and an application of their message to the contemporary world. Students will also explore the background of New Testament prophecy, apocalyptic literature, and Gnosticism (Nag Hammadi library) and the critical, theological, hermeneutical, and historical issues as they relate to the General Epistles and the Johannine Literature.

NT 8331 Seminar in the Epistle to the Romans

This course is an in-depth study of the Apostle Paul’s Epistle to the Romans involving a careful exegesis of the Greek text with special attention given to theological problems and critical issues that modern scholars have raised about the book (e.g., salvation by faith, God’s sovereignty in election, predestination, and man’s free will). Students will also explore practical applications of the epistle’s teachings to the church and to the contemporary world.

BI 9040 Biblical Language Proficiency Exam: Hebrew/Aramaic

Written/Oral examination designed to measure proficiency in the primary biblical languages of Hebrew and Aramaic.

BI 9042 Biblical Language Proficiency Exam: Greek

Written/Oral examination designed to measure proficiency in the primary biblical language of Greek.

BI 9044 Secondary Language Proficiency Exam

Written/Oral examination designed to measure proficiency of a secondary research language.

BI 9046 Comprehensive Examination for Doctor of Philosophy

Written and oral examinations designed to measure the synthesis of the biblical studies curriculum.

RD 9320 Dissertation I

This course serves as the initial step in formulating a research topic, methodology, bibliography, and research proposal. Students will also be required to submit a draft of chapter one of the dissertation which includes a review of literature.

RD 9321 Dissertation II

This course serves as a continuation of the dissertation process. Students will complete a draft of chapter two and make revisions as recommended by the dissertation committee.

RD 9322 Dissertation III

This course serves as a continuation of the dissertation process. Students will complete a draft of chapter three and make revisions as recommended by the dissertation committee.

RD 9323 Dissertation IV

This course serves as a continuation of the dissertation process. Students will complete chapter four (conclusion) of the dissertation, make all necessary corrections and revisions of dissertation, and pass public defense of the dissertation.

 

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